Maxims, Songs & Poems: Miscellaneous Notes in Renaissance Books - Queens' Old Library
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The volume bears the signature of two previous owners: on this page we see that of Johannes Goodluck,  'Joh[ann]es Goodluck est custos huius libri' (‘the keeper of this book’). Below this inscription, another hand has added a price and a very interesting poem in Latin entitled ‘De matre sua Edwardi’ (‘On Edward’s mother’). The following verses are indeed the epitaph of Queen Emma of Normandy (d. 1054), mother of Edward the Confessor. In early modern England, as well as providing material evidence for historians, epitaphs such as this bore devotional value as a means to relate to the dead.



'Duxit Ethelredus __ ha[n]c, & postea Knutus.
Edwardum s[an]ct[u]m parit hoc atque Hardecanutu[m].
Quator hoc reges hec vidit sceptra fere[n]tes.
Angloru[m] regu[m] suit hec sic mater et uxor.'

('She was first married to King Ethelred, and afterwards to King Canute. To the former she bore Edward, to the latter Hardincanute. She saw all these four kings wielding the royal sceptre; and thus was the wife and mother of English kings.'  Translation from John Milner, The History Civil and Ecclesiastical, & Suruey of the Antiquities, Winchester, 1809.)

'Si non sit auditor non est detractor.'

('If one is not a listener, one is not a detractor.'
Saint Thomas Aquinas, Exposition of the Psalms of David, Psalm 14.



Author: Terence
Title: Publij Terentij Aphri comicorum latinorum principis Comediae (Lyon, 1520)
Shelfmark: H.5.12 (catalogue record)

The volume bears the signature of two previous owners: on this page we see that of Johannes Goodluck, 'Joh[ann]es Goodluck est custos huius libri' (‘the keeper of this book’). Below this inscription, another hand has added a price and a very interesting poem in Latin entitled ‘De matre sua Edwardi’ (‘On Edward’s mother’). The following verses are indeed the epitaph of Queen Emma of Normandy (d. 1054), mother of Edward the Confessor. In early modern England, as well as providing material evidence for historians, epitaphs such as this bore devotional value as a means to relate to the dead.


'Duxit Ethelredus __ ha[n]c, & postea Knutus. Edwardum s[an]ct[u]m parit hoc atque Hardecanutu[m]. Quator hoc reges hec vidit sceptra fere[n]tes. Angloru[m] regu[m] suit hec sic mater et uxor.'
('She was first married to King Ethelred, and afterwards to King Canute. To the former she bore Edward, to the latter Hardincanute. She saw all these four kings wielding the royal sceptre; and thus was the wife and mother of English kings.' Translation from John Milner, The History Civil and Ecclesiastical, & Suruey of the Antiquities, Winchester, 1809.)

'Si non sit auditor non est detractor.'
('If one is not a listener, one is not a detractor.' Saint Thomas Aquinas, Exposition of the Psalms of David, Psalm 14.

Author: Terence
Title: Publij Terentij Aphri comicorum latinorum principis Comediae (Lyon, 1520)
Shelfmark: H.5.12 (catalogue record)

16th centuryH.5.12annotationsflyleavesinscriptionsprovenance